Curriculum

At Holy Trinity we use the International Primary Curriculum as the basis of our creative curriculum.  A creative curriculum enhances all subjects, allows children to take risks and makes learning exciting and motivational. Through the use of art and drama and weaving movement, music and creativity into everyday teaching, lessons become lively and exciting. The use of specialists in the classroom enhance the curriculum, develop and build upon teacher’s skills and improve learning for all pupils.

 

Some examples of creative teaching

  • Using music and images to develop poetry and creative writing
  • Using music during maths sessions either for reinforcement or for rote learning
  • Using drama to develop historical understanding
  • Using the outdoors for practical learning- geography, story telling, DT
  • Using mind mapping techniques
  • Linking subjects to the creative arts e.g sculpture, dance and maths
  • Using galleries, museums, nature parks as teaching areas

 

Ten top tips for the creative classroom

  • Explore what’s possible through the senses
  • Value all contributions
  • Focus on questions rather than answers
  • Make it safe to take risks
  • Allow time for ideas to emerge
  • Encourage and develop visualisation
  • Dream, draw and describe before you write
  • You have to know the rules before you can break them
  • Make connections and then make some more
  • Make the familiar unfamiliar and the unfamiliar familiar

 

Key factors for effective learning to take place in school

  • Healthy and fit children- morning fitness, fruit time, growing and cooking
  • Making connections and seeing the big picture- mind mapping, Blooms taxonomy
  • Questioning
  • Emotional intelligence- self esteem, stress management, use of language, breaking down problems, strategies for managing conflict
  • Learning styles 
  • Portfolio of intelligence
  • Slow thinking – giving time to children to digest, consider and explore problems and possibilities in order for their learning to become truly embedded. 

National testing takes place in year 2 and year 6, when the children are 7 and 11. This happens in the summer term and determines levels of achievement. The results are published annually.

Key stage 1

% achieving level 2+

 

Maths

Reading

Writing

2008

85%

83%

72%

2009

83%

80%

73%

2010

81%

77%

74%

2011

87%

83%

50%

2012

90%

84%

81%

2013

90%

90%

87%

 

 

 

 

 

Key stage 2

% achieving level 4+

 

Mathematics

English

Science

Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar

2008

100%

100%

100%

2009

96%

100%

100%

2010

93%

90%

97%

2011

97%

100%

97%

2012

100%

100%

100%2

2013

100%

100%

100%

92%